Students’ disappearance in China remains a mystery

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Reports of missing university students from Wuhan, Hubei Province has started to attract attention from the Chinese community. Previous cases have not been resolved and yet more students are going missing.
 
Rumors have suggested that the disappearances were associated with organ trafficking.
 
However, authorities have restricted public release of any information. Messages on media platforms have been deleted, while parents and friends of victims were threatened for speaking to the public.
 
Recently, a post titled "Where has the 30 college students gone?" has been circulating online and has generated growing concern from the public.
 
In the article, personal details of more than 10 missing students were revealed. One of whom, Feiyang Lin, has disappeared shortly after arriving in Wuhan from Moscow in Nov 26, 2015. He was last seen on Changqing Road, Hankou District, Wuhan.
 
<img class="alignnone size-full wp-image-1202" src="https://world.nzlife.nz/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/图片2.png" alt="" width="400" height="446" />
 
In the respective order of name, university attended and missing date, the details of 7 other students were also released. These included:
 
Pengfei Xiao, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, 31/12/2014
 
Zongbin, Shuai, Wuhan Polytechnic University, 17/03/2016
 
Hao Cheng, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 28/11/2014
 
Chang Qian, Wuhan Polytechnic University, 13/06/2011
 
Hao Xu, Wuhan Education Institute, 18/02/2013
 
Minghu Zhu, Wuhan University, 04/01/2013
 
Yuhong, Zhu, Wuhan University, 04/2009
 
Immediately after this report has been published, the journalist was taken into custody for the offence of 'spreading rumours.' Chinese police officials have claimed that Lin's case has been filed and was undergoing investigation. Contrary to reports from families of missing students, the police claimed that only three students from the list were 'actually missing'.
 
To the concerned families, the police appeared 'unwilling' to help. In an interview, father of missing student Xiao, said, “the police said that my son couldn’t be located on the camera as it was too dark. Considering how much money has been spent on surveillance cameras in this city, I do not believe it.”
 
Another parent, father of student Lin, had a similar experience with the police.  With the help of a taxi driver, the police have traced Lin down from surveillance cameras at a bus stop. However, the police told Lin’s father that they had lost Lin from there, and was not able to investigate any further.
 
“I cannot accept their explanations. Everyone knows that our country has a highly sophisticated surveillance system. They were able to track down and returned a stolen bicycle for some Japanese traveler not long ago. It is not that they were not ‘able to’ locate my son, but unwilling to,” said Mr Lin.
 
Without any updates or confirmation of death from local authorities, parents have started their own search out of desperation. Mr Lin has put up posters of his missing son both locally and in provinces nearby. However, he is no closer to finding his son.
 
<img class="wp-image-1200 size-full" src="https://world.nzlife.nz/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Capture-142.png" alt="Photo: Looking for a 20 year old Lin, skinny, height 1.85m, shy character. RMB¥100,000 reward offered by Lin's parents (poster provided by the father)" width="603" height="342" /> Photo: Looking for a 20 year old Lin, skinny, height 1.85m, shy character. RMB¥100,000 reward offered by Lin's parents (poster provided by the father)
 
Despite the concerns and heated debates among the public, authorities have yet provided official explanations or statements for the missing students.
 
Strangely, there seem to be similarities among students who have disappeared between 2013 and 2016. Most of them are young healthy males under the age of 20, approximately 180cm tall and academically high achievers.
 
There has been a horrifying speculation that these mysterious disappearances were related to organ trafficking, which has been prevalent in China in the last two decades.
 
“There is a possibility that my son, like young adults who have disappeared in this manner, were kidnapped, and killed after their kidneys were harvested.” Xiao's father said, “There is no information on the news. Nothing in the paper, and nothing online. We cannot find anything related.”
 
<img class="wp-image-1201 size-full" src="https://world.nzlife.nz/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/图片1.jpg" alt="Photo: screenshot of the group chat online User comments: a country with more than 20 million CCTV cameras has been capable of tracing stolen bikes, wallets and passports for foreign tourists. But failed to keep its own citizens in sight? 1. What has happened to the students? Have they committed suicide? Brainwashed by some illegal organisation? Kidnapped by aliens? Kidnapped for organ harvesting? Arrested secretly? 2. The Chinese government and nationwide authorities are fully responsible for these disappearances. A taxpayer’s money is not for the sole purpose of serving international tourists and locating their belongings. Where are the basic rights for a citizen? " width="600" height="992" /> Photo: screenshot of the group chat online User comments: a country with more than 20 million CCTV cameras has been capable of tracing stolen bikes, wallets and passports for foreign tourists. But failed to keep its own citizens in sight? 1. What has happened to the students? Have they committed suicide? Brainwashed by some illegal organisation? Kidnapped by aliens? Kidnapped for organ harvesting? Arrested secretly? 2. The Chinese government and nationwide authorities are fully responsible for these disappearances. A taxpayer’s money is not for the sole purpose of serving international tourists and locating their belongings. Where are the basic rights for a citizen?
 
In the past few years, the incidence of missing people in China have been tied to organ harvesting. In Jul 2006, a 3-year-old boy near the Zangwang region of China showed up at his daycare after being missing for 3 days. He had no recollections of the past 3 days but had “pain on the lower back.” Later examinations revealed that a kidney has been removed.
 
In Feb 2012, a man in Chongqing woke up from a “stomachache” in a motel in Dongguan city. His later discovered that his left kidney has been removed.
 
In Jun 2015, Yongwei Liu discovered that his right kidney has been removed after a chest surgery in a hospital of Xuhzhou.
 
The inhumane organ trafficking business in China has been repeatedly reported and discussed internationally. However, the Chinese government is still denying and restricting citizens from revealing information to both domestic and overseas media.
 
From: <a href="https://world.nzlife.nz/2017/10/21/students-disappearance-in-china-remains-a-mystery/">World.nzife.nz</a>
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